Digital Dialogue Five | Black Futures / Black Technopoetics

Image
Illustrated geometric graphic
March 9, 2022
3:30PM - 5:00PM
Location
Zoom

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2022-03-09 15:30:00 2022-03-09 17:00:00 Digital Dialogue Five | Black Futures / Black Technopoetics Accessibility: This event will have live, human transcription provided for all attendees. To request additional accommodations, complete the RSVP webform and email globalartsandhumanities@osu.edu Black Futures / Black Technopoetics Featured Speakers Stephanie Dinkins | Kusama Professor of Art, Stony Brook University Louis Chude-Sokei | Professor of English and George and Joyce Wein Chair in African American Studies, Boston University Moderator | Kris Paulsen: Associate Professor, History of Art In this performative lecture and dialogue, artist Stephanie Dinkins and writer/scholar Louis Chude-Sokei will engage art, artificial intelligence and technopoetics as products of the African diaspora and of a desire to construct Black and other futures. The dialogue will explore the relationship between technologies and race, including how algorithms intersect with gender, race and history and how configurations of the inhuman or artificial make possible dominant understandings of the human, and the challenges of building ethics into global technocultures. Zoom Global Arts and Humanities globalartsandhumanities@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Accessibility: This event will have live, human transcription provided for all attendees. To request additional accommodations, complete the RSVP webform and email globalartsandhumanities@osu.edu


Black Futures / Black Technopoetics

Featured Speakers

  • Stephanie Dinkins | Kusama Professor of Art, Stony Brook University
  • Louis Chude-Sokei | Professor of English and George and Joyce Wein Chair in African American Studies, Boston University

Moderator | Kris Paulsen: Associate Professor, History of Art

In this performative lecture and dialogue, artist Stephanie Dinkins and writer/scholar Louis Chude-Sokei will engage art, artificial intelligence and technopoetics as products of the African diaspora and of a desire to construct Black and other futures. The dialogue will explore the relationship between technologies and race, including how algorithms intersect with gender, race and history and how configurations of the inhuman or artificial make possible dominant understandings of the human, and the challenges of building ethics into global technocultures.

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