Digital Dialogue Four | Earthworks Rising: Native Art and Literature

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Illustrated geometric graphic
February 2, 2022
3:30PM - 5:00PM
Location
Zoom

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2022-02-02 15:30:00 2022-02-02 17:00:00 Digital Dialogue Four | Earthworks Rising: Native Art and Literature Accessibility: This event will have live, human transcription provided for all attendees. To request additional accommodations, complete the RSVP webform and email globalartsandhumanities@osu.edu Earthworks Rising: Native Art and Literature Featured Speaker | Chadwick Allen: Russell F. Stark University Professor and Associate Vice Provost for Faculty Advancement, Department of English-University of Washington Moderator: Maurice Stevens: Professor, Department of Comparative Studies Since the eighteenth century, Indigenous mounds have been represented as the tragic ruins of “lost” civilizations: “mysteries” and “enigmas” with no relation to living Native American peoples and no ongoing relevance. Digital Dialogue Three considers how Native writers, artists and communities refuse these discourses of extinction through vibrant acts of imagination — asserting the multiple ways that mounds and other earthworks continue to hold ancient knowledge and make new meaning — in the present and for the future. Zoom Global Arts and Humanities globalartsandhumanities@osu.edu America/New_York public
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Accessibility: This event will have live, human transcription provided for all attendees. To request additional accommodations, complete the RSVP webform and email globalartsandhumanities@osu.edu


Earthworks Rising: Native Art and Literature

  • Featured Speaker | Chadwick Allen: Russell F. Stark University Professor and Associate Vice Provost for Faculty Advancement, Department of English-University of Washington
  • Moderator: Maurice Stevens: Professor, Department of Comparative Studies

Since the eighteenth century, Indigenous mounds have been represented as the tragic ruins of “lost” civilizations: “mysteries” and “enigmas” with no relation to living Native American peoples and no ongoing relevance. Digital Dialogue Three considers how Native writers, artists and communities refuse these discourses of extinction through vibrant acts of imagination — asserting the multiple ways that mounds and other earthworks continue to hold ancient knowledge and make new meaning — in the present and for the future.

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